Endodontic Retreatment

Endodontic treatment is extremely successful, but occassionaly the tooth will fail to heal or will develop new problems. In this case a second endodontic procedure may be recommended to save the tooth.

What is involved in this procedure?
What is an endodontist?
Will I feel pain during or after the procedure?
Will my tooth need special care afterwards?
Are there alternatives to endodontic retreatment?


What is involved in this procedure?

Inflamed Tissue Cleaned Canal

Step 1: The endodontist will remove any materials previously used to seal the tooth, such as a crown, post, or canal filling.

Step 2: Your endodontist will clean the root canals and attempt to find any extraordinary canals that may be present.

Step 3: After treating the cause of the problem the endodontist will then fill and seal the canals. Afterwards you will need to make an appointment with your dentist to have a crown or other restoration placed on your tooth to restore it to full function.


What is an endodontist?

An endodontist is a dentist who has received three years of advanced training in endodontic procedures and has limited their practice to performing only endodontic procedures. Dentists will regularly refer patients needing endodontic procedures to an endodontist because of their experience in dealing with both routine and difficult endodontic procedures. Endodontists are also experts in diagnosing the cause of oral and facial pain.


Will I feel pain during or after the procedure?

Most patients report that they are comfortable during endodontic retreatment. After retreatment the tooth may be sensitive and you may experience slight discomfort. However, your endodontist will give you instructions regarding which medications will relieve this pain. If you experience severe pain or pain that lasts for longer than a few days contact your endodontist.


Will my tooth need special care afterwards?

Other than practicing proper oral hygiene your tooth should not require any special treatment and should function as well as any other tooth. You may need to make an appointment with your dentist to have a crown or other restoration placed on your tooth. If you do then you cannot use the tooth for chewing or biting until it has been fully restored.


Are there alternatives to endodontic retreatment?

There are alternatives to endodontic retreatment which require the removal of the tooth. The extracted tooth must be replaced with a fixed bridge, implant, or removable partial denture. These procedures are often more time-consuming and will thus be more costly than endodontic treatment and the restoration of the natural tooth. As well, while they are effective, modern tooth replacements are still not as good as having your natural tooth.